Episode 308

On the final episode of Season 3 of OsiyoTV, meet three Cherokee Nation citizens doing their part to sustain their culture. Dorothy Ice is one of the original Sequoyah Indian Weavers and a Cherokee National Treasure; Joseph Erb is an artist, filmmaker, animator and technologist who utilizes the Cherokee language in his art; and Will Chavez is the assistant editor for the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper and who recently completed the 2017 Remember The Removal Bike Ride, thirty three years after he participated in the inaugural ride.

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IN THIS EPISODE

Dorothy Ice: Weaving the Tapestry of Tradition

Cherokee National Treasure Dorothy Ice is one of the original weavers from the celebrated Sequoyah Indian Weavers Association. She shares her memories of growing up in the small, rural community of Briggs, Oklahoma, and how she learned to make her well-known diamond-weave blankets.

Riding the Trail of Tears with Will Chavez

Will Chavez, a 22-year veteran reporter for the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper, comes full circle on the 2017 Remember the Removal Bike Ride. A participant of the first ride in 1984, he tells OsiyoTV how retracing his ancestors’ steps more than 30 years later affected his experience this time.

Joseph Erb, Cherokee Renaissance Man

Whether he’s creating digital animation or engraving copper, Joseph Erb possesses the unique talent of flawlessly incorporating the traditional and modern. Contemporary icons routinely find their way into traditional artwork, and symbols of Cherokee lore come alive through computer-generated imagery, the technology of the future. See how his love for past and present drive his passion to keep the culture alive for future generations.

Cherokee Almanac: Sequoyah's Cabin

One of the most respected Cherokees is Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee written language. In this “Cherokee Almanac,” OsiyoTV visits his historical cabin near present-day Sallisaw, Oklahoma, to reveal more of what you may not know about his life.

Let's Talk Cherokee

Learn to speak key words and phrases in the Cherokee language with speaker Anna Sixkiller and Cherokee Nation Immersion School students. This month, learn how to say, “I’m hungry. Let’s eat,” “This food is good,” “Did you cook this meal,” “I don’t like cabbage” and “Let’s go to a restaurant to eat.”