Episode 407

Join OsiyoTV for homecoming at the University of North Texas’ Apogee Stadium with quarterback Mason Fine; hear Cherokee storyteller Robert Lewis share a time-honored tale as well as his own life story; and spend time with Betty Frogg as she reflects on the importance of learning and sharing the Cherokee language and culture. The episode also examines the historic 1843 International Indian Council and includes a new Cherokee language lesson.

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IN THIS EPISODE

Robert Lewis, Telling Traditional Tales

He’s a Cherokee National Treasure with a big smile and an even bigger talent for storytelling. Robert Lewis has a penchant for sharing the traditional stories passed down to him through generations, and, here, he shares his life story with OsiyoTV.

Betty Frogg, Speaking Through Generations

Culture keeper Betty Frogg is a Cherokee National Treasure, a basket weaver, a practicer of traditional arts and a first-language Cherokee speaker. As a child, she was encouraged to speak in Cherokee. Now, she teaches and empowers students at the Cherokee Immersion Charter School to do the same.

Tackling Game Day with Mason Fine

OsiyoTV met football prodigy and star student Mason Fine in 2015 during his senior year at Locust Grove High School. Then, he was dreaming of playing for a Division I college team. Now, Mason’s living his dream as the starting quarterback for the University of North Texas’ Mean Green football team.

Cherokee Almanac: The International Indian Council of 1843

In 1843, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief John Ross called a meeting of the Indian Nations that had been forcibly relocated to Indian Territory. The landmark occasion was the first of its kind, and it was documented in both words and images. In this “Cherokee Almanac,” we examine first-hand accounts of the remarkable gathering, including a missionary’s letters and a well-known painting now hanging in Gilcrease Museum.

Let's Talk Cherokee

Cherokee elder and speaker Lawrence Panther gets back to basics teaching the Cherokee syllabary with help from Cherokee Immersion Charter School student Cooper. In this lesson, they share pronunciation of several Cherokee consonant sounds and words created from them, including “fourteen,” “pine tree,” “moon” and “potato.”