Episode 401

The Season 4 premiere of “Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People” brings all-new stories of Cherokee people, culture, and history.
In this episode, we venture deep into Cherokee Country to visit the Foreman family and learn how these folks fell in love with rodeo and the cowboy way of life. Then, OsiyoTV gets in the ring with The Man They Call Fuel, a Cherokee professional wrestler whose enthusiasm is rivaled only by his drive to help others. Cherokee National Treasure Martha Berry then shares how a desire to reconnect with her heritage led to helping recover the nearly lost art of Southeastern-style beadwork.
We also look at the history of Springplace Mission, the first mission of its kind established to educate Cherokees, and get back to language basics in a new set of “Let’s Talk Cherokee” language lessons.

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IN THIS EPISODE

The Foreman Family, Roping Strong

There’s a family in Oaks, Oklahoma, best known to its neighbors for two things: love for community and rodeo. OsiyoTV joins the Foreman family for a little roping action as they reveal the family history that brought them here and show us the fun in keeping their clan together.

Brad Eubanks, The Man They Call Fuel

He’s a single father working a 9 to 5 job at the Cherokee Nation, but outside of work he dominates in the wrestling ring, and it’s all for a good cause. Brad is a model employee, but “Fuel” is a wrestling superstar like you’ve never met.

Martha Berry, Leading a Beadwork Revival

Martha Berry has played a vital role in reviving the practice of Southeastern-style beadwork that was nearly lost after the Trail of Tears. Learn how her journey in search of knowledge and artistry helped lead to a renaissance of Cherokee and Southeastern beadwork.

Cherokee Almanac: Springplace Mission

Founded in 1801, Springplace Mission with the first mission to the Cherokees and offered a formal educational institution to Cherokee students.

Let's Talk Cherokee

Learn to identify and speak the sounds of the Cherokee syllabary in a new set of Cherokee language lessons. In this lesson, learn the Cherokee words for “water,” “aunt,” “pumpkin,” “groundhog,” “white” and “locust” with Lawrence Panther and Cherokee Charter Immersion School students.